Brooklyn To Mars - Issue 1

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Brooklyn To Mars - Issue 1

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Issue One

Something pretty amazing happened to me the other day.  I was going to reprint copies of Issue One.  I wanted to make them available to people who didn’t have a chance to read the first edition.  As I read through the typewritten pages, I couldn’t help but thinking “Holy shit.  These stories came true.” 

I was lost when I wrote that first issue.  I was writing about things that I hoped were true but didn’t know for sure.  Quotes like “Your work is to discover your work and then, with all your heart, give yourself to it.” –The Buddha

And also, “Everything that is really great and inspiring is created by the individual who can labor in freedom.”  - Einstein

And things that I wrote myself like, “If you take one thing from this zine and apply it to your life, let it be perseverance.  You must never give up.  Stay strong and focused.”

The thing is, I didn’t know what I was doing when I wrote that first zine.  I remember the day very clearly.  It was very cold and sunny in New York.  And I was so bored and so stir-crazy, I went outside for no reason, put my headphones on and started walking.  It was a bone rattling frigid day.  I went into a Staples to keep warm.  I left with a paper cutter, a long-reach stapler and a fresh typewriter ribbon.

I had things written.  I had little stories in my journal and on my computer that I had written when I was in school.  I was majoring in Finance and Economics but something didn’t feel right while I was in school.  I had straight A’s and departmental honors but the idea of working for a corporation made me sick.

Even though I was going to classes in the morning, working 8 hours at a record label during the day and doing hours of homework every night, I found myself staying up until 5 in the morning, writing these little stories – stories about being frustrating and stories that were basically an effort to convince myself to start a business.

So, almost a year later, I found the stories I had written in school and I typed them up on my little portable typewriter.  When that was done, I cut them out, and laid out the zine with a glue stick and a little imagination.  I made copies and asked a bookstore in Brooklyn to sell them on consignment. 

As I re-read the pages, I felt proud and thankful that I was stupid enough to publish them.  It was a crazy idea – to take an old yellow typewriter and publish a handmade zine in the age of ebooks and Kindles.  But I did it anyway because it felt important.  I was writing from a place of optimism and faith.  And I suppose I was discovering my work.

This is the issue that Steven Pressfield (author of the War of Art) said, “I read it cover to cover and loved every piece.”

  • Limited Edition

  • Printed on 100lb Charcoal Brown card stock

  • The cover photo is taken from a vintage Polaroid

  • Inside booklet features 7 original 19th-century engravings